Habitat Enhancement Effectiveness - Biological Monitoring & Evaluation IV

Salmonid Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation (RM&E)

Monitoring
Project ID15-Umat-03
Recovery DomainsMiddle Columbia River
Start Date03/01/2016
End Date08/31/2020
Year2015
StatusCompleted
Last Edited05/08/2024
 
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Description    


The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation’s (CTUIR) biomonitoring plan was created to evaluate the effectiveness of CTUIR habitat restoration projects on spring Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) populations across the five subbasins of the Columbia River- Umatilla, Walla Walla, Grande Ronde, John Day and Tucannon. The scope of this biomonitoring project includes the direct measurement of physical habitat improvements and monitoring of juvenile and adult fish populations. The results will provide accountability for restoration effectiveness and also serve to guide future management decisions. The ability to detect biological changes in response to habitat restoration is critical for determining habitat quantity and quality, and to understand what particular restoration action or suite of actions yield the greatest fish response. This project included biomonitoring on Meacham Creek in the Umatilla River Basin.

Specific work that occurred under this project at the Meacham Creek worksite included the following:

Habitat Attribute Monitoring along 1.2 river miles. CTUIR employees participate in the yearly 10 day training course for the CHaMP habitat monitoring protocol and become competent prior to field work with equipment, field protocols, data post processing, and QA/QC procedures . CTUIR implements habitat surveys using a combination of CHaMP and AEM data collection methodology that is used to collect habitat attributes including in-channel characteristics, sediment, riparian condition, floodplain characteristics, and water quality. These habitat characteristics are used to evaluate the effectiveness of restoration activities.

Benthic Macroinvertebrate Sampling along 1.2 river miles. A composite sample of benthic macroinvertebrates was accrued for each treatment and control site using a method derived from the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) targeted riffle sampling protocol.

Adult Abundance and Distribution for spring Chinook and summer steelhead during March-September along 19 river miles. Adult abundance and distribution is estimated based on redd and carcass counts conducted in the treatment and control reaches. Sampling occured annually commencing at the onset of the spawning season and continuing approximately every 10–14 days until spawning is complete . Data derived from redd count surveys includes abundance and distribution of spawners.

Juvenile Fish Abundance Snorkeling during summer and fall along 1.2 river miles. Snorkel surveyors attended a yearly training that is coordinated through BPA’s AEM program. Juvenile snorkel surveys were conducted for the entirety of each treatment and control site. Species, size class (10mm accuracy), habitat unit, and instream structure usage were recorded for each fish throughout the reach.

Juvenile Salmonid Electrofishing and PIT Tagging along 1.2 river miles. Juvenile electrofishing events consisted of a three-pass depletion method with low-voltage to herd fish into a seine or dip net. Block nets are placed at the upstream and downstream ends of individual habitat units to prevent migration of fish between habitat types during the capture events and allow for a more accurate attribution of population size by habitat type. PIT tagging procedures follow BPA’s ISEMP protocol for the Upper Columbia River Basin and are consistent with PTAGIS protocols for uploading and data management.

Project Benefit    


The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) is implementing a habitat restoration program with emphasis on reducing the effects of primary limiting factors (i.e. water temperature and habitat complexity) and restoring natural ecological processes. Biomonitoring sample sites have been selected for evaluating a biological response to habitat restoration; and the expected benefit is to improve habitat quality for adult holding and spawning, and juvenile rearing of fish species of interest. Monitoring habitat in parallel with fish surveys can provide valuable information regarding fish/habitat relationships . Specifically, we’ll study the response of juvenile fish density, growth, migration timing, and survival to habitat restoration at three sites located in Meacham Creek.

Accomplishments

Metric Completed Originally
Proposed
Research and Monitoring
  Stream Miles Monitored 19.00 6.50

Funding Details

SourceFunds
PCSRF$50,000
Other$51,400
Report Total:$101,400


Project Map



Worksites

Meacham Creek    


  • Worksite Identifier: Meacham Creek
  • Start Date: 01/01/2016
  • End Date: 06/30/2020
Area Description

No Area Description data was found for this worksite.

Location Information

  • Basin: Middle Columbia (170701)
  • Subbasin:
  • Watershed:
  • Subwatershed:
  • State: Oregon
  • Recovery Domain: Middle Columbia River
  • Latitude: 45.64654
  • Longitude: -118.3606

ESU

  • Mid-Columbia River Spring-run Chinook Salmon ESU
  • Middle Columbia River Steelhead DPS

Map

Photos

Figure 4 - Final Report Figure 1 - Final Report Figure 2 - Final Report Figure 5 - Final Report Figure 6 - Final Report Figure 7 - Final Report Figure 8 - Final Report Figure 12 - Final Report Figure 13 - Final Report

Metrics

Metrics
  • E.0 Salmonid Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation (RM&E)Y (Y/N)
    •      . . E.0.a RM&E Funding 101,400.00
    •      . . E.0.b
      Complement habitat restoration project
      This monitoring complements the habitat implementation by CTUIR’s Umatilla Anadromous Fish Habitat project (1987-100-01).
    •      . . E.0.c
      Project identified in a plan or watershed assessment.
      Biological Effectiveness Monitoring and Evaluation Plan for Fisheries Habitat Enhancement in CTUIR Subbasins (Stillwater Sciences 2011b) Columbia Habitat Monitoring Program (CHaMP)(Bouwes et al. 2011)
    •      . . E.0.d.1 Number of Cooperating Organizations 3
    •      . . E.0.d.2
      Name Of Cooperating Organizations.
      Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), Columbia River Intertribal Fish Commission (CRITFC), Bonneville Power Administration’s Action Effectiveness Workplan (BPA AEM)
    •      . . E.0.e.1 Number of reports prepared 3
    •      . . E.0.e.2
      Name Of Report
      Costi, K., Contor. C., Shippentower. G. 2016. Fish Habitat Enhancement Biological Effectiveness Monitoring, 2015 Annual Progress Report. Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, 46411 Ti’Mine Way, Pendleton, OR. Report submitted to Bonneville Power Administration, Project No. 2009-014-00, Contract 68461 Costi, K., Wildbill, A., Shippentower. G. 2017. Fish Habitat Enhancement Biological Effectiveness Monitoring, 2016 Annual Progress Report. Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, 46411 Ti’Mine Way, Pendleton, OR. Report submitted to Bonneville Power Administration, Project No. 2009-014-00, Contract 71934 Costi, K., et. al. 2019. Fish Habitat Enhancement Biological Effectiveness Monitoring, 2017 Annual Progress Report. Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, 46411 Ti’Mine Way, Pendleton, OR. Report submitted to Bonneville Power Administration, Project No. 2009-014-00 Contract 73982 REL 6
    •      . . E.1 MonitoringY (Y/N)
      •      . . . . E.1.a Monitoring funding 101,400.00
      •      . . . . E.1.b.1 Stream Miles Monitored 19.00
      •      . . . . E.1.b.2 Acres of Watershed Area Monitored 37.9
      •      . . . . E.1.b.3 Square miles of water monitored.13 (Square miles)
      •      . . . . E.1.c.2 Salmonid smolt or fry monitoringY (Y/N)
        •      . . . . . . E.1.c.2.a # miles (to nearest 0.01 mile) monitored for Salmonid smolt or fry 1.20
      •      . . . . E.1.c.3 Biological instream monitoring (other than salmon)Y (Y/N)
        •      . . . . . . E.1.c.3.a # miles (to nearest 0.01 mile) monitored for Biological indicies (other than salmon) 1.20
      •      . . . . E.1.c.4 Redd countsY (Y/N)
        •      . . . . . . E.1.c.4.a # miles (to nearest 0.01 mile) monitored for redds 19.00
      •      . . . . E.1.c.5 Carcass countsY (Y/N)
        •      . . . . . . E.1.c.5.a # miles (to nearest 0.01 mile) monitored for Carcasses 19.00
      •      . . . . E.1.c.8 Water quality monitoringY (Y/N)
        •      . . . . . . E.1.c.8.a # miles (to nearest 0.01 mile) of stream monitored for water quality 1.20
      •      . . . . E.1.c.13 Restoration effectiveness monitoringY (Y/N)
        •      . . . . . . E.1.c.13.a # miles (to nearest 0.01 mile) of stream or streambank monitored 1.20
        •      . . . . . . E.1.c.13.c # acres (to nearest 0.1 acre) monitored 37.9
      •      . . . . E.1.c.14 Restoration validation monitoringY (Y/N)
        •      . . . . . . E.1.c.14.a # miles (to nearest 0.01 mile) stream or streambank monitored 1.20
        •      . . . . . . E.1.c.14.c # acres (to nearest 0.1 acre) monitored 37.9
        •      . . . . E.1.d
          Name Of Comprehensive Monitoring Strategy/Program
          Bonneville Power Administration, Action Effectiveness Monitoring Program CTUIR and ODFW. 1990. Umatilla Hatchery Master Plan. Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Pendleton, OR (+3 more, see project proposal)
        •      . . . . E.1.e
          Description of monitoring
          The CTUIR biomonitoring field surveys consisted of habitat, macroinvertebrate, juvenile and adult salmonid sampling. Habitat Attribute Monitoring CTUIR employees participated in the yearly 10 day training course for the CHaMP habitat monitoring protocol and became competent prior to field work with equipment, field protocols, data post processing, and QA/QC procedures (Bouwes et al 2011). CTUIR implemented habitat surveys using a combination of CHaMP and AEM data collection methodology. CHaMP methods provide standardized metrics that can be used to measure response variables in salmonid habitat changes. Metrics generated from habitat surveys as they relate to limiting factors are shown in Table 1 (see attached proposal) Benthic Macroinvertebrate Sampling Macroinvertebrates are considered an excellent indicator of water quality and overall stream health. Their quantified response to in-stream restoration actions makes them a valuable tool for monitoring restoration effectiveness (Miller et al. 2010). Due to their limited mobility macroinvertebrates are directly affected by their immediate surroundings making them an important indicator at a smaller reach monitoring scale (Platts et al. 1983). A composite sample of benthic macroinvertebrates were accrued for each treatment and control site using a method derived from the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) targeted riffle sampling protocol (Peck 2006). Standard lab analysis and index values are derived for each benthic sample including; biomass, taxa richness, Hilsenhoff Biotic Index (HBI) (Hilsenhoff 1988), and Oregon PREDictive (PREDATOR) model results (Hubler 2008). Adult Abundance and Distribution Adult abundance and distribution is estimated based on redd and carcass counts conducted in the treatment and control reaches. Sampling occured annually commencing at the onset of the spawning season and continuing approximately every 10–14 days until spawning is complete (Gallagher 2007). Data derived from redd count surveys include: 1. Index temporal abundance of spawners 2. Estimate total abundance of spawning females 3. Determine spatial spawning distribution 4. Determine temporal spawning distribution Coordination with other monitoring entities (ODFW and WDFW) occured annually in order to minimize data collection overlap. Redd abundance was calculated using the number of observed redds in a year by site length. Increased sinuosity and a site’s River Complexity Index (RCI; Brown 2002) would be expected to be factors in the increase of redd abundance at a site. Juvenile Fish Abundance Snorkeling Snorkel surveyors attended a yearly training that is coordinated through BPA’s AEM program. Methodology is discussed and calibration of surveyors across all projects in correctly documenting fork lengths underwater takes place. Juvenile snorkel surveys are conducted for the entirety of each treatment and control site. Species, size class (10mm accuracy), habitat unit, and instream structure usage are recorded for each fish throughout the reach (Crawford 2011). https://www.monitoringresources.org/Document/Method/Details/4228 Data derived from snorkel surveys include: 1. Juvenile fish density and Abundance (fish/m2) 2. Life history diversity within a site. 3. Fish use of available habitat structures