Little Trout Creek Habitat Improvement Project

Salmonid Habitat Restoration and Acquisition

Fish Passage Improvement Instream Habitat Riparian Habitat Upland Habitat And Sediment
Project IDOWEB 220-4025-17469
Recovery DomainsInterior Columbia
Start Date04/22/2020
End Date05/19/2021
Year2017
StatusCompleted
Last Edited07/21/2022
 
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Description    


This project encompassed the lower mile of Little Trout Creek, working to restore this section of Little Trout Creek and the adjacent floodplain to a geomorphically stable form that provides the habitat diversity, floodplain hydrology, hydraulic and sediment transport function of a naturally occurring, dynamic fluvial environment. Restoration activities included re-meandering the channel, grading the floodplain, building pools and installing large wood complexes in the stream and on the floodplain. Two rocked ford crossings that were passage barriers were removed and a new replacement ford constructed to allow fish passage at all flows. Additionally, a livestock water gap was created upstream of the ford crossing. In the riparian area juniper was thinned, invasive species were treated, and the area planted with native grass, shrubs, and trees. Finally, new livestock exclusion fencing was installed along sections of the project area, creating full protection of the stream and riparian zone. This project completed early because the scheduled end date was established with extra time needed to account for potential delays due to Covid. However, this extra time was ultimately not needed. The proposed riparian habitat funding was overestimated and the instream funding was underestimated; it is more appropriately reflected in the actual funding amounts reported. Because the project restoration actions of floodplain reconnection increased the overall riparian area, the proposed upland activities (invasive removal, juniper thinning, planting) should have been reported as riparian. The actual metrics reflect the inclusion of those former upland areas/activities in the riparian zone. Additionally, there was one water gap developed in the riparian that was inadvertently omitted from the proposed metrics.

Project Benefit    


Salmonid species in the Little Trout Creek watershed include summer steelhead and rainbow trout. Summer Steelhead is classified as “wild” and is managed for natural production. Trout Creek summer steelhead are part of the Mid-Columbia Evolutionary Significant Unit (ESU) that are presently listed as threatened under the Federal Endangered Species Act. Efforts to protect and enhance salmonid populations throughout the Deschutes River Basin, and particularly in the eastside tributaries, have been ongoing for the past several decades.
Limiting factors within the project area that affect salmonids are: 1) loss of connectivity of the stream & floodplain; 2) increased delivery of sediment to streams; 3) loss of large woody debris in the streams and riparian zone; 4) elimination or reductions of vegetative canopies; 5) altered hydrological regimes (timing & size); 6) loss of floodplain function (resulting in dewatered riparian zones, wetlands, and streams); 7) degraded water quality (elevated water temperature, nutrients, and toxicants); 8) man made fish passage barriers/semi-barriers.
The JCSWCD/ODFW are proposing a stream restoration/channel enhancement project that will restore natural stream and floodplain functions including proper channel dimension, pattern, and profile for Little Trout Creek. This project will address the limiting factors listed above: The reconstruction of the channel and creation of a new floodplain will significantly contribute to the restoration of 1)connectivity of the stream and floodplain; 2) the decrease of sediment inputs from stream bank erosion; 3) increase of large woody debris by creating 39 pools with habit structures, 4) an improvement in riparian vegetation, that in combination with, 6) proper floodplain function, will improve, 7) water quality (decrease stream temperature). Finally, 8) a man-made stream crossing (elevated ford) will be improved to provide adequate fish passage for all life stages of fish.
These restoration actions will result in an improvement of critical habitat that will lead to the recovery of summer Steelhead and improve habitat conditions for other fish and wildlife resources in the watershed. We expect this project, over time, to contribute to an improvement in critical summer steelhead spawning and rearing habitat, resulting in elevated natural spawning populations and substantial increases in juvenile out-migrants.

Accomplishments

Metric Completed Originally
Proposed
Instream Habitat
  Stream Miles Treated 1.12 1.12
Riparian Habitat
  Stream Miles Treated 2.24 2.24
  Acres Treated 27.7 8.6
Upland Habitat
  Acres Treated .0 13.4
Fish Passage
  Barriers Removed
  Miles Opened 5.00 5.00

Funding Details

SourceFunds
PCSRF$130,967
Other$225,189
In-Kind Donated Labor$152,125
In-Kind Other$8,250
Report Total:$516,531


Project Map



Worksites

20200393    


  • Worksite Identifier: 20200393
  • Start Date:
  • End Date:
Area Description

No Area Description data was found for this worksite.

Location Information

  • Basin: Deschutes
  • Subbasin:
  • Watershed:
  • Subwatershed:
  • State: Oregon
  • Recovery Domain: Interior Columbia
  • Latitude: 44.77272413
  • Longitude: -120.75957499

ESU

  • Middle Columbia River Steelhead DPS

Map

Photos

Metrics

Metrics
  • C.0 Salmonid Habitat Restoration and AcquisitionY (Y/N)
    •      . . C.0.a Habitat restoration and acquisition funding 516,530.50
    •      . . C.0.b Length of stream treated/protected 1.12
    •      . . C.0.c
      Project identified in a Plan or Watershed Assessment
      Northwest Power and Conservation Council, 2004-01-01, Northwest Power and Conservation Council Deschutes Subbasin Plan; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, 2010-02-01, Conservation and Recovery Plan for Oregon Steelhead Populations in the Middle Columbia River Steelhead Distinct Population Segment;
    •      . . C.0.d.1 Project Monitoring (LOV)
    •      . . C.0.d.2 Monitoring Location (LOV)
    •      . . C.2 Fish Passage ImprovementY (Y/N)
      •      . . . . C.2.a Fish Passage Funding 25,826.97
      •      . . . . C.2.b.1 Length of stream made accessible 5.00
      •      . . . . C.2.b.3 Type of blockage/barrier (LOV)
      •      . . . . C.2.b.4 Number of blockages/impediments/barriers impeding passage 2
      •      . . . . C.2.h.1 Rocked ford - road stream crossingY (Y/N)
        •      . . . . . . C.2.h.2 Number of rocked fords placed 1
        •      . . . . . . C.2.h.3 Miles of stream made accessible by rocked ford placement 5.00
      •      . . . . C.2.i.1 Road stream crossing removal Y (Y/N)
        •      . . . . . . C.2.i.2 Number of road crossings removed 1
        •      . . . . . . C.2.i.3 Miles of stream made accessible by road stream crossing removal 5.00
      •      . . C.4 Instream Habitat ProjectY (Y/N)
        •      . . . . C.4.a Instream Habitat Funding 309,918.70
        •      . . . . C.4.b Total length of instream habitat treated 1.12
        •      . . . . C.4.c.1 Channel reconfiguration and connectivityY (Y/N)
          •      . . . . . . C.4.c.2 Type of change to channel configuration and connectivity (LOV)
          •      . . . . . . C.4.c.3 Miles of stream treated for channel reconfiguration and connectivity 1.00
          •      . . . . . . C.4.c.4 Miles of off-channel stream created through channel reconfiguration and connectivity .01
          •      . . . . . . C.4.c.6 Instream pools created/added through channel reconfiguration and connectivity 0
        •      . . . . C.4.d.1 Channel structure placementY (Y/N)
          •      . . . . . . C.4.d.2 Material used for channel structure (LOV)
          •      . . . . . . C.4.d.3 Miles of stream treated through channel structure placement 1.12
          •      . . . . . . C.4.d.5 Pools expected to be created through channel structure placement 40
          •      . . . . . . C.4.d.7 Number of structures placed in channel 111
        •      . . C.5 Riparian Habitat ProjectY (Y/N)
          •      . . . . C.5.a Riparian Habitat Funding 180,784.83
          •      . . . . C.5.b.1 Total riparian miles streambank treated 2.24
          •      . . . . C.5.b.2 Total Riparian Acres Treated 27.7
          •      . . . . C.5.c.1 Riparian plantingY (Y/N)
            •      . . . . . . C.5.c.2
              Species of plants planted in riparian
              Riparian Seed Mix: Basin Wildrye - 40%, Streambank Wheatgrass - 20%, Bluebunch Wheatgrass - 10%, Idaho fescue - 10%, Priarie Junegrass - 8% Big Bluegrass - 6%, Lewis Blue Flax - 2.5%, Blanket Flower - 2%, Yarrow - 1%, Rocky Mtn Iris - 0.5%., Upland Seed Mix: Bluebunch wheatgrass - 25%, Idaho Fescue - 25%, Big Bluegrass - 15%, Basin Wildrye - 10%, Indian Ricegrass - 10%, Sandberg's Bluegrass - 5%, Bottlebrush squirreltail - 5%, Antelope bitterbrush - 2%, Yarrow - 1%, Arrowleaf balsamroot - 1%, Lewis Blue Flax - 1%. Upland seed mix: Bluebunch wheatgrass - 25%, Idaho Fescue - 25%, Big Bluegrass - 15%, Basin Wildrye - 10%, Indian Ricegrass - 10%, Sandberg's Bluegrass - 5%, Bottlebrush squirreltail - 5%, Antelope bitterbrush - 2%, Yarrow - 1%, Arrowleaf balsamroot - 1%, Lewis Blue Flax - 1%.; Riparian Species: Coyote Willow - 1161, Black Cottonwood - 1000, Red-Osier Dogwood - 900, Pacific Willow - 852, Water Birch - 837, Quaking Aspen - 250, Upland Species: Chokecherry - 544, Golden Currant - 500, Blue Elderberry - 500, Wood's Rose - 311, Serviceberry - 289, Mock Orange - 256, Ponderosa Pine - 100
            •      . . . . . . C.5.c.3 Acres planted in riparian 27.7
            •      . . . . . . C.5.c.4 Miles of streambank treated with riparian planting 2.24
          •      . . . . C.5.d.1 FencingY (Y/N)
            •      . . . . . . C.5.d.2 Miles of fence along stream 2.24
            •      . . . . . . C.5.d.3 Acres of riparian area protected by fencing 27.7
          •      . . . . C.5.f.1 Water gap developmentY (Y/N)
            •      . . . . . . C.5.f.2 Number of water gap installations 1
            •      . . . . . . C.5.f.3 Miles of streambank protected by water gap development .01
          •      . . . . C.5.h.1 Riparian plant removal/controlY (Y/N)
            •      . . . . . . C.5.h.2
              Species of plants treated/removed in riparian
              medusahead rye, cheatgrass, basin big sagebrush, scotch thistle, knapweed, Canada thistle
            •      . . . . . . C.5.h.3 Acres of riparian treated for plant removal/control 27.7
            •      . . . . . . C.5.h.4 Miles of streambank treated for riparian plant removal/control 2.24
          •      . . . . C.5.i.1 Forestry practices/stand managementY (Y/N)
            •      . . . . . . C.5.i.2 Acres treated for riparian forestry practices/stand management 27.7
          •      . . C.6 Upland Habitat And Sediment ProjectY (Y/N)
            •      . . . . C.6.a Upland Habitat / Sediment Funding .00
            •      . . . . C.6.b.1 Acres of upland habitat area treated .0
            •      . . . . C.6.f.1 Planting for erosion and sediment controlY (Y/N)
              •      . . . . . . C.6.f.2
                Species of plants planted for erosion and sediment control
            •      . . . . C.6.h.1 Upland vegetation managementY (Y/N)
              •      . . . . . . C.6.h.2
                Species of plants in upland vegetation management
              •      . . . . . . C.6.h.3 Acres treated for upland vegetation management .0