Pratt Creek Channel Rehabilitation

Salmonid Habitat Restoration and Acquisition

Instream Habitat Riparian Habitat Upland Habitat And Sediment
Project ID015 17 SA
Recovery DomainsInterior Columbia
Start Date03/19/2018
End Date10/31/2021
Year2017
StatusOngoing
Last Edited10/21/2021
 
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Description    


The objectives of the Pratt Creek Restoration are 1) to return Pratt Creek to a more natural location and morphology where fish passage, fish habitat, and riparian vegetation can be facilitated and maintained, 2) restore wetland and riparian habitat along the new stream channel, 3) maximize instream rearing habitat for juvenile salmonid spawning habitat for adult steelhead, and 4) establish a weed-free, native riparian and wetland community.

Project construction will relocate 2,100 feet (0.40 mile) of Pratt Creek to a more natural location and channel morphology for fish passage, habitat, and riparian vegetation. The current reach of Pratt Creek that has been straightened and heavily grazed will be abandoned. The new channel will include improved habitat complexity by incorporating meanders, excavating 22 pools and installing 34 structures instream (stumps with roots attached). Channel construction will include approximately 1 acre of floodplain construction.

Revegetation will be accomplished by means of planting native species within the riparian zone and transplanting local vegetation harvested near the project site. Reestablishing a weed-free, native riparian community is expected to improve water quality by reducing sediment delivery to the creek and preventing increases in water temperature. Riparian treatment will consist of seeding and installation of sod mats, containerized plants and willow stakes on approximately 3.4 acres on 0.80 mile (0.40 mile on each side) of Pratt Creek. Woody plants are likely to include Populus balsamifera spp. Trichocarpa, Cornus sericea, Amelanchier alnifolia, Alnus viridis, Rosa woodsii, two Ribes spp., and five Salix spp. The native seed mixture is likely to include Calamagrostis canadensis, Deschampsia cespitosa, Elymus lanceolatus, E. elymoides, E. glaucous, E. canadensis, Bromus marginatus, Leymus cinereus, Pseudoroegneria spicata, Poa secunda, P. palustris, Phleum alpinum, Glyceria elata, G. grandis, Oryzopsis hymenoides, Koeleria macrantha, Artemisia tridentata, Festuca idahoensis, and Pascopyrum smithii. Noxious weeds as identified by the State of Idaho will be treated within the project area after construction on all disturbed areas.

Livestock fencing will be placed with a 35-foot buffer on each side of the newly realigned channel to protect and improve success of revegetation efforts. The fence will protect 0.26 linear mile of both sides of Pratt Creek for a total of 0.52 mile of fencing. One ford will be installed to allow livestock crossing.

Two amendments to the contract allowed for higher-than-anticipated bids for planting, irrigation and stockwater installation, and the ability to mitigate for spring activation in an area that inhibited ranch operations.

Project Benefit    


The project will benefit the Lemhi River Snake River Steelhead population within the Salmon River Major Population Group (MPG) and the Lemhi River Snake River Spring/Summer Chinook Salmon population within the Upper Salmon River MPG.

The project will accomplish these specific restoration goals:
- Create a new morphologically appropriate channel segment through existing low ground.
- Improve water quality through stabilization of newly created streambanks to reduce fine grained sediment input, and prevent increases in water temperature.
- Improve thermal refuge by increasing the frequency and magnitude of self-maintaining pools.

Habitat quantity will be increased by improving fish passage conditions to upstream habitat and increasing channel complexity. Creation of a new channel will promote increased channel diversity, allow for the natural development and maintenance of scour pools, and increase bank stability. Development of an appropriate width-to-depth ratio will reduce open water surface area at low flow, reducing localized thermal loading, and will increase floodplain connectivity for natural recruitment and survivability of native seed sources. Bank treatments and altered land use practices will increase bank stability and reduce localized fine-grained sediment inputs.

Development of a robust riparian corridor will over time increase shade, reduce thermal loading, increase bank stability and aid in sediment retention.

This project will address five of the nine limiting factors identified by FCRPS including water temperature, increased sediment, bed and channel form, floodplain condition, and riparian condition.

Accomplishments

Metric Completed Originally
Proposed
Instream Habitat
  Stream Miles Treated .40
Riparian Habitat
  Stream Miles Treated .80
  Acres Treated 3.4
Upland Habitat
  Acres Treated .1

Funding Details

SourceFunds
PCSRF$196,014
Other$172,515
Report Total:$368,529


Project Map



Worksites

Pratt Creek    


  • Worksite Identifier: Pratt Creek
  • Start Date: 09/01/2018
  • End Date: 11/30/2018
Area Description
Salmon Subbasin, Lemhi 4th field HUC 17060204, Pratt Creek watershed

Location Information

  • Basin: Salmon
  • Subbasin:
  • Watershed:
  • Subwatershed:
  • State: Idaho
  • Recovery Domain: Interior Columbia
  • Latitude: 45.076006
  • Longitude: -113.698583

ESU

  • Snake River Spring/Summer-run Chinook Salmon ESU
  • Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS

Map

Photos

Metrics

Metrics
  • C.0 Salmonid Habitat Restoration and AcquisitionY (Y/N)
    •      . . C.0.a Habitat restoration and acquisition funding .00
    •      . . C.0.b Length of stream treated/protected
    •      . . C.0.c
      Project identified in a Plan or Watershed Assessment
    •      . . C.0.d.1 Project Monitoring (LOV)
    •      . . C.0.d.2 Monitoring Location (LOV)
    •      . . C.4 Instream Habitat ProjectY (Y/N)
      •      . . . . C.4.a Instream Habitat Funding
      •      . . . . C.4.b Total length of instream habitat treated
      •      . . . . C.4.c.1 Channel reconfiguration and connectivityY (Y/N)
        •      . . . . . . C.4.c.2 Type of change to channel configuration and connectivity (LOV)
        •      . . . . . . C.4.c.3 Miles of stream treated for channel reconfiguration and connectivity
        •      . . . . . . C.4.c.4 Miles of off-channel stream created through channel reconfiguration and connectivity
        •      . . . . . . C.4.c.5 Acres of off-channel or floodplain connected through channel reconfiguration and connectivity
        •      . . . . . . C.4.c.6 Instream pools created/added through channel reconfiguration and connectivity
      •      . . . . C.4.d.1 Channel structure placementY (Y/N)
        •      . . . . . . C.4.d.2 Material used for channel structure (LOV)
        •      . . . . . . C.4.d.3 Miles of stream treated through channel structure placement
        •      . . . . . . C.4.d.5 Pools expected to be created through channel structure placement
        •      . . . . . . C.4.d.7 Number of structures placed in channel
      •      . . C.5 Riparian Habitat ProjectY (Y/N)
        •      . . . . C.5.a Riparian Habitat Funding
        •      . . . . C.5.b.1 Total riparian miles streambank treated
        •      . . . . C.5.b.2 Total Riparian Acres Treated
        •      . . . . C.5.c.1 Riparian plantingY (Y/N)
          •      . . . . . . C.5.c.2
            Species of plants planted in riparian
          •      . . . . . . C.5.c.3 Acres planted in riparian
        •      . . . . C.5.d.1 FencingY (Y/N)
          •      . . . . . . C.5.d.2 Miles of fence along stream
        •      . . . . C.5.f.1 Water gap developmentY (Y/N)
          •      . . . . . . C.5.f.2 Number of water gap installations
        •      . . . . C.5.h.1 Riparian plant removal/controlY (Y/N)
          •      . . . . . . C.5.h.3 Acres of riparian treated for plant removal/control
        •      . . C.6 Upland Habitat And Sediment ProjectY (Y/N)
          •      . . . . C.6.a Upland Habitat / Sediment Funding
          •      . . . . C.6.b.1 Acres of upland habitat area treated
          •      . . . . C.6.h.1 Upland vegetation managementY (Y/N)
            •      . . . . . . C.6.h.2
              Species of plants in upland vegetation management
            •      . . . . . . C.6.h.3 Acres treated for upland vegetation management
          •      . . . . C.6.j.1 Upland livestock management Y (Y/N)
            •      . . . . . . C.6.j.2 Upland livestock management action(s) taken (LOV)
            •      . . . . . . C.6.j.4 Number of livestock water installations/developments