Oxbow Conservation Area Tailings Restoration, Phase II

Salmonid Habitat Restoration and Acquisition

Instream Habitat Riparian Habitat
Project ID11-Warm-06
Recovery DomainsInterior Columbia
Start Date06/01/2012
End Date08/31/2012
Year2011
StatusCompleted
Last Edited10/21/2021
 
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Description    


This funding helped complete the phase 2 project including over 900 feet of new channel construction, de-watering of a 3,400 feet dredge ditch which bifurcated the river, grading 30,000 cubic yards of tailings, transporting about 12,000 cubic yards of soil to cover about 20 acres of tailings, installation of 400 whole trees for use as large wood structures along channel (14 structures) and along floodplains, planting of 3,100 containerized plants, installation of an irrigation system, and installation of 2,600 feet of eight-foot high ungulate-proof fencing.

OWEB funding (project #212-6020-9146) was also used for this project and since the OWEB funding was all from STATE funds, CRITFC reported all of the metrics under this project.

Project Benefit    


The project seeks to restore hydraulic and ecosystem processes for riparian and instream habitats critical for Mid-Columbia summer steelhead, spring Chinook salmon, and bull trout. This multi-phased project is located in the heart of spring Chinook salmon spawning, adult holding, and juvenile rearing. The property averages 13% of spring Chinook salmon spawning in this critical habitat zone of the MFJD watershed, but spawning is below site potential due to past dredging. The property exceptional juvenile rearing potential, stemming from its location in the watershed and the six perennial tributaries entering the river within the property, but degraded habitat conditions limit current production. The Project site will benefit connectivity to the river on three tributaries: Butte Creek, Granite Boulder Creek and Ruby Creek. All three creeks are use by steelhead for rearing and spawning. All three creeks are used by spring Chinook salmon for rearing. Pacific lamprey are present in all of these creeks, as well as the river.

The project will restore instream habitat conditions and structure for salmonid production, and set the stage for processes needed to sustain habitat features. This project seeks to greatly enhance instream habitat for salmonids in terms of holding cover and spawning gravel availability. The project seeks to reduce overall stream temperature through removal of a dredged channel bifurcation, which will reduce the solar exposure to the stream. Water temperature will also be buffered through an extensive vegetation plan, which promotes stream shading and appropriate channel widths on the constructed channel segments.

Accomplishments

Metric Completed Originally
Proposed
Instream Habitat
  Stream Miles Treated .20 2.00
Riparian Habitat
  Stream Miles Treated .20 .38
  Acres Treated 20.0 1.6

Funding Details

SourceFunds
PCSRF$69,580
Other$395,000
Report Total:$464,580


Project Map



Worksites

Oxbow Conservation Area    


  • Worksite Identifier: Oxbow Conservation Area
  • Start Date:
  • End Date:
Area Description
Middle Fork John Day River

Location Information

  • Basin: John Day
  • Subbasin:
  • Watershed:
  • Subwatershed:
  • State: Oregon
  • Recovery Domain: Interior Columbia
  • Latitude: 44.645805
  • Longitude: -118.65139

ESU

  • Mid-Columbia River Spring-run Chinook Salmon ESU
  • Middle Columbia River Steelhead DPS

Map

Photos

Metrics

Metrics
  • C.0 Salmonid Habitat Restoration and AcquisitionY (Y/N)
    •      . . C.0.a Habitat restoration and acquisition funding 464,580.00
    •      . . C.0.b Length of stream treated/protected .20
    •      . . C.0.c
      Project identified in a Plan or Watershed Assessment
      Columbia-Blue Mountain Resource Conservation & Development Area (CBMRC&D), 2005. John Day Subbasin Revised Draft Plan. Prepared for the Northwest Power and Conservation Council. March 15. Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. 2010. Oxbow and Forrest Conservation Areas Property and Habitat Management Plan. March U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. 2008. Middle Fork and Upper John Day River Tributary Assessments, Grant County, Oregon. Technical Service Center, Denver, Colorado and Pacific Northwest Regional Office, Boise, Idaho. May. U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. 2010. Oxbow Conservation Area Reach Assessment, Middle Fork John Day River, Grant County, Oregon. Pacific Northwest Regional Office, Boise, Idaho. March.
    •      . . C.0.d.1 Project Monitoring (LOV)
    •      . . C.0.d.2 Monitoring Location (LOV)
    •      . . C.0.d.3
      Monitoring text (from Phase I)
      Monitoring includes water temperature, juvenile salmonid and other fish usage (assemblages) snorkeling counts, riparian vegetation transects, photo points, spawning survey data, groundwater (wells onsite), and physical monitoring. The Middle Fork John Day Intensively Monitored Watershed (IMW) program will also be collecting geomorphology study related efforts, channel dimensions, hyporheic temperature exchange (fiber optic cable deploys), PIBO habitat survey protocols, macroinvertebrates monitoring, and other effectiveness monitoring relating to fish populations within the watershed. The IMW monitoring may or may not measure project specific effects.
    •      . . C.4 Instream Habitat ProjectY (Y/N)
      •      . . . . C.4.a Instream Habitat Funding 264,280.00
      •      . . . . C.4.b Total length of instream habitat treated .20
      •      . . . . C.4.c.1 Channel reconfiguration and connectivityY (Y/N)
        •      . . . . . . C.4.c.2 Type of change to channel configuration and connectivity (LOV)
        •      . . . . . . C.4.c.3 Miles of stream treated for channel reconfiguration and connectivity .20
        •      . . . . . . C.4.c.4 Miles of off-channel stream created through channel reconfiguration and connectivity .00
        •      . . . . . . C.4.c.5 Acres of off-channel or floodplain connected through channel reconfiguration and connectivity 10.0
        •      . . . . . . C.4.c.6 Instream pools created/added through channel reconfiguration and connectivity 12
      •      . . . . C.4.d.1 Channel structure placementY (Y/N)
        •      . . . . . . C.4.d.2 Material used for channel structure (LOV)
        •      . . . . . . C.4.d.3 Miles of stream treated through channel structure placement .20
        •      . . . . . . C.4.d.4 Acres of streambed treated through channel structure placement 2.0
        •      . . . . . . C.4.d.5 Pools expected to be created through channel structure placement 12
        •      . . . . . . C.4.d.6 Yards of average stream-width at mid-point of channel structure placement project6 (Yards)
        •      . . . . . . C.4.d.7 Number of structures placed in channel 14
      •      . . C.5 Riparian Habitat ProjectY (Y/N)
        •      . . . . C.5.a Riparian Habitat Funding 200,300.00
        •      . . . . C.5.b.1 Total riparian miles streambank treated .20
        •      . . . . C.5.b.2 Total Riparian Acres Treated 20.0
        •      . . . . C.5.c.1 Riparian plantingY (Y/N)
          •      . . . . . . C.5.c.2
            Species of plants planted in riparian
            Dogwood_ Cornus sericea), coyote (Salix exigua) and Geyers (Salix geyeriana), white alder (Alnus rhombifolia), Lemmon willow (Salix lemmonii), black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa), rose (Rosa sp.) and black hawthorn (Crataegus douglasii) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), chokecherry (Prunus virginiana), and blue elderberry (Sambucus nigra)
          •      . . . . . . C.5.c.3 Acres planted in riparian 10.0
        •      . . . . C.5.d.1 FencingY (Y/N)
          •      . . . . . . C.5.d.2 Miles of fence along stream .60
          •      . . . . . . C.5.d.3 Acres of riparian area protected by fencing 10.0